Japanese Maples

Native to Japan, these deciduous perennial trees known for their striking fall foliage were introduced to the US in the 19th century and have been bred into hundreds of beautiful cultivars since. Japanese Maples make a great low-maintenance addition to any landscape, though be sure to plant them somewhere with dappled or afternoon shade. There are currently over 300 hundred known cultivars of Japanese Maple. Let's take a deeper look at four cultivars currently available at Painters.



'Inaba Shidare' Weeping Red Laceleaf Japanese Maple Acer palmatum dissectum

'Inaba Shidare'

Weeping Red Laceleaf Japanese Maple

Acer palmatum dissectum


A great medium sized cascading red leaf maple for full sun!

This variety is a landscaper's favorite with beautiful weeping branches with dainty laceleaf foliage. The leaves range in color from deep red-purple to scarlet and the fall color is a fiery scarlet red. In 10-15 years the tree will get 4-5' tall and 5-6' wide and will have an umbrella shape. Works well in full sun and as a container grown tree.

Zones: 5-9


 'Crimson Queen' Weeping Red Laceleaf Japanese Maple Acer palmatum dissectum

'Crimson Queen'

Weeping Red Laceleaf Japanese Maple

Acer palmatum dissectum


A great medium sized cascading red leaf maple for shade!

Crimson Queen holds great color in shade - it's the best option out of these four varieties for shady areas. Fiery red fall color. In 15-20 years 3-4' tall and 5-6' wide. Low cascading umbrella shape with very dense foliage. Focal planting - prefers late day shade as protection from the hot afternoon sun.

Zones: 5-9


'Sango Kaku' Upright Coral Bark Japanese Maple Acer palmatum

'Sango Kaku'

Upright Coral Bark Japanese Maple

Acer palmatum

An upright maple with bright red trunk and limbs for winter interest!

'Sango Kaku' means 'Coral Towers' and this is a classic Coral Bark Maple. This tree will reach 20-25' in height and has an upright form with bright red trunk and limbs. Chartreuse green leaves in spring with red edging, fall color is a golden-yellow which contrasts beautifully with the bright red bark! The cold weather intensifies the bright red color. Plant in your garden where you can enjoy the winter interest!

Zones: 6-9


 'Tamukeyama' Weeping Red Laceleaf Japanese Maple Acer palmatum dissectum

'Tamukeyama'

Weeping Red Laceleaf Japanese Maple

Acer palmatum dissectum


The best cold and heat tolerant red weeping maple!

It's name translates to 'Hands Folded on a Mountain'. Cold hardy selection - because it leafs out two weeks later than other Japanese Maples it usually misses late freezes. This cultivar also grows great in high heat areas and is very sun tolerant, which makes 'Tamukeyama' a perfect addition to any location! Makes a low cascading umbrella with its weeping limbs. In 15 years, 'Tamukeyama' reaches 4-5' in height and 5-6' spread. Great as a patio or deck container plant.

Zones: 5-9

PLANTING

If you have heavy clay soil it's best to plant your Japanese Maple 2-4 inches shallower, to allow a raised mound to ensure drainage. Also incorporate 10-2% organic matter into the soil to help with drainage and aeration. Typically Japanese maples prefer dappled or afternoon shade, especially when young, to avoid leaf scorch in hot and dry locations in full sun.

Make sure to water newly planted trees thoroughly through the summer to prevent stress.

Prefers protection from late spring frosts (especially when young) and protection from strong winds.

CONTAINERS

If growing in a container, Japanese Maples prefer for their containers to be somewhat snug - don't go larger than twice the diameter of the rootball and no deeper than the existing root ball. The best container soil for Japanese maples is a mixture of half potting soil and half aged bark - vermiculite or perlite can be substituted for the bark.

FERTILIZING

Newly planted trees get fertilized too soon. This increase in unnecessary above ground growth invites disease and dieback in the stems. Only after the Japanese Maple becomes establish (1-2 years), should fertilizing even be considered. Do not put large amounts of nitrogen on your tree the first couple years, instead apply a small amount of organic slow release fertilizer in the spring (5-5-5 works well).

PRUNING

Pruning of trees is often done in winter, but during the time Japanese Maples are prone to "bleed" or ooze sap. This flow of sap can lead to disease invasion and weakening of the tree. Instead, it's suggested to prune your Japanese Maples in mid-summer (between mid-July and August) when the sap won't run from cuts. Touchup prune annually, and thorough prune every three years.

MULCHING

Mulch heavier than you would other trees and shrubs - 6" of mulch will help protect and cool the maple's shallow root system. This will also help with water retention.

TIP

Maples are often grafted - make sure to remove any shoots growing from the base of the plant whose leaves look different from the rest of the plant. Usually the rootstock on grafted trees are very vigorous, and if left to grow these shoots can over take your preferred variety that's grafted onto it.Native to Japan, these deciduous perennial trees known for their striking fall foliage were introduced to the US in the 19th century and have been bred into hundreds of beautiful cultivars since. Japanese Maples make a great low-maintenance addition to any landscape, though be sure to plant them somewhere with dappled or afternoon shade. There are currently over 300 hundred known cultivars of Japanese Maple. Let's take a deeper look at four cultivars currently available at Painters.

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